Category Archives: nutrition

Different Types of Protein and Why It Matters…

The Differences Between Proteins and Why It Matters

What is Protein?

Protein is a Macromolecule (Macronutrient) made up of amino acids (building blocks) that perform myriad of functions in the body.  For example, they spark metabolic reactions,  duplicate DNA,  respond to stimuli, and move molecules from place to place.  Consuming protein is essential because we are not able to make all the amino acids necessary for life function without food.  When our bodies digest protein, it breaks it down into the amino acids we use for metabolism.  Protein is  a part of every cell in our bodies!  It is needed to build and repair muscle tissue and is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood.  In addition, it makes essential enzymes, hormones, and other chemicals in the body.

Where does protein come from?

There are many sources of protein.  The most commonly known are: meat, milk, fish, soy, and eggs, cheese, as well beans, legumes, and nut butters.  Some proteins, mainly from animal sources, are called complete proteins.  They contain all the essential amino acids needed for the body to use.  The incomplete proteins lack all the essential amino acids, therefore, requiring additional proteins to make them complete.  Furthermore, the different kinds of proteins are used differently in the body

Some popular Proteins and how the body utilizes them…

1.  Whey Protein– is a complete protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids)  and is derived from milk.  Milk is made up of  whey and casein.  It is separated and through a process, the whey is turned into a powder leaving very little lactose in the final product.  Whey protein is a fast acting protein, meaning it is digested rapidly to be used for muscle building, a long with many other health benefits.  A study published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism concluded that “whey protein supplementation during resistance training offers some benefit compared to resistance training alone.”  This is why many bodybuilders and athletes consume whey protein immediately after a workout.

2.  Casein Protein– is a slow acting protein, meaning the body digests the protein more slowly, releasing the amino acids steadily through the bloodstream for hours.  Casein is perfect to consume prior to bed to keep your body from breaking down muscle for energy.  It would also be a good option if you know you won’t be eating for a while.

3.  Soy Protein– another complete protein but derived from plants.  It is a slow acting protein.  Because it is a slow acting protein it isn’t optimal for rebuilding muscle rather it’s better for forming new muscle tissue.  In addition, soy produces isoflavones, which have antioxidant effects, resulting in enhanced recovery time as well as reduced soreness and inflammation.

This is a very simplified article on Protein and far from an exhaustive list. The main point is to inform you that protein is essential for the body and you can get it in a variety of ways.  Depending on your goals, you can now incorporate additional protein into your diet.

How much protein should you be consuming?

This is a tricky question.  But the one must is to not go by the RDA numbers.  These were calculated in 1941 during World War 11.  During this time, food rationing was going on and numbers were based on the average person’s needs.  Things have changed dramatically in the past few decades and, it is of my opinion, that these numbers are not relevant for today’s society.  As a general rule: try to consume around 20-30% of your daily calories in protein.

How do you figure out how much protein is 20-30% of your daily calories?

1.  Go to calculator.net and enter your stats

http://www.calculator.net/calorie-calculator.html

2.  take the number and times it by .2 (if you don’t workout much) or .3 (if you workout at least 3x/wk).  This number will give you the amount of calories of protein you need to consume each day.

3.  Then divide this number by 4 (because there are 4 calories in every gram of protein) and you will get your daily number of grams of protein.

4.  Finally divide this number by the amount of meals you will eat throughout the day.  This will give you the exact amount of protein grams you should shoot for in each meal.

Check out my daily meal plan post(click here) to see when I use my protein shakes and what I eat to fulfill my protein requirements.

 

My Typical Day’s Meals

Many people want to know what I eat on a typical day, so I figured I’d share it with all of you.  All meals are eaten within 2 1/2 to 3 hours apart

Breakfast (eaten within 30 minutes of waking): egg whites with rolled oats made as a pancake with organic honey, cinnamon, and sea salt

Meal 2: whole eggs, boiled ham and shredded cheese

hormone free, anti-biotic free, arificial sweetener free, delicious, protein
Best Protein

Meal 3: one source of lean protein (chix, steak, fish, turkey) with grilled veggies, mozz cheese and avocado

Meal 4: post workout shake (or regular shake), I use BioTrust Protein because it’s free of antibiotics, hormones, and artificial sweeteners!  And it tastes delicious!!!

Meal 5: once source of lean protein over salad with lots of veggies, avocado, shredded cheese, balsamic vinegar

Meal 6: before bed, another BioTrust shake

There you have it!  A day in the life of Gayle’s eating!

 

The first question people always ask me is, “what is the best way to lose weight?”  Although I can make that simple question extremely complicated…the simplest and best answer is to drink more water.

 WATER…DOES THE BODY GOOD

                                                                                               Did you know that…
water photo

  • 70% of the adult human body is made up of water?
  • our blood is made up of 80% water and water is needed to make healthy red blood cells
  • our bones are made up of 50% water and water is needed to make healthy new bone cells
  • you can only live one week without water compared to 1 month without food?
  • water helps maintain healthy body weight because it increases metabolism and helps to regulate appetite?
  • water increases energy levels?
  • water decreases the risk of many cancers?
  • water can reduce joint and back pain through lubrication?
  • water flushes toxins that cause disease?
  • water aids in digestion and prevents constipation?
  • just a 2% reduction in hydration leads to fatigue and diminished cognitive function?
  • it also leads to a rise in the stress hormone, Cortisol, which is responsible for weight gain?
  • eight 8oz glasses of water a day is just a myth?

Q:  So now that you know why drinking water is so important, how do you know if you are drinking enough?
A:  You can tell by the color of your urine.  If your urine is straw-colored, you’re doing great!

I keep a bottle of water with me at all times and am drinking all through the day. photo I do not drink soda (except on a rare occasion), I limit my coffee to one cup in the morning, and if I need to have some flavor I add some lemon juice or use crystal light in my water.

For all of you who say you can’t drink so much water; I say…yes you can you just don’t want to!  The body needs and craves water.  When you feel hungry, it’s most likely that you are really thirsty!  Just think of how many calories you could save by drinking a tall glass of water!

 

Interesting Fact

According to a recent study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition around 37 percent of our total daily liquid calories come from sugar-sweetened drinks.  Just to break that down for you…if you are eating a 2000 calorie diet, you’d be drinking 740 of those calories.  WHAT?  Is it so surprising that 65% of the population is overweight or obese?  Just taking these empty calories out of your diet could save you from putting on one pound of fat every 5 days!

SO…ditch those empty calorie drinks, drink more water, and see if you don’t drop some weight.